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EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT VETERAN DEPENDENTS/SURVIVING FAMILY MEMBERS:

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If you’re a spouse or dependent child of a Veteran or service member, you may be able to use transferred education benefits for your classes and training. Learn more about these benefits and how to apply.

You may be eligible to use transferred benefits if you meet all of these requirements.

All of these must be true:

The Defense Department (DOD) approved the service member’s request for a Transfer of Education Benefits (TEB), and

You’re enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS), and

You’ll use the transferred benefits during the required timeframe

Find out when you can use transferred benefits

If you were married to the service member or Veteran but are divorced now, you’ll continue to be eligible as long as the service member doesn’t revoke (cancel) the transfer of benefits.

The service member needs to request a Transfer of Education Benefits (TEB) through milConnect first. They must make this request while they’re on active duty or in the Selected Reserve.

If the Defense Department approves the request, you can then apply to use the transferred benefits.

The service member can cancel (revoke) or change the transfer of benefits at any time, as long as we haven’t awarded them to you yet. We award benefits at the start of each term.

SPOUSE :

If you received transferred benefits as a spouse, you can use the benefits right away. You can use them while the service member is on active duty or after they’ve separated from service.

 

The time limit for these benefits depends on when the service member separated from service:If the service member separated before January 1, 2013, you can use these benefits for up to 15 years after their separation from active duty. This is as long as the service member or Veteran doesn’t revoke (cancel) the transfer of benefits.

 

If the service member separated on or after January 1, 2013, you can use these benefits at any time. There’s no time limit on the benefits, as long as the service member or Veteran doesn’t revoke (cancel) the transfer of benefits.

 

Note: You don’t qualify for the monthly housing allowance while the service member is on active duty.

CHILD:

If you received transferred benefits as a child of a service member, you can start to use these benefits only after the service member has finished at least 10 years of service.

 

You can use these benefits while the service member is on active duty or after they’ve separated from service.You must meet these requirements:

- You can’t use these benefits until you have a high school diploma (or a certificate that’s equivalent) or turn 18 years old, whichever comes first

-You must use these benefits before you turn 26 years old

 

Note: You may qualify for the monthly housing allowance, even when the service member is on active duty.

DEA PROGRAM:

Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance (DEA) program. If you’re the child or spouse of a Veteran or service member who has died, is captured or missing, or has disabilities, you may be able to get help paying for school or job training through the DEA program—also called Chapter 35.

 

Find out if you’re eligible for this benefit.

One of these descriptions must be true for the Veteran or service member:

The Veteran or service member is permanently and totally disabled due to a service-connected disability,

OR

The Veteran or service member died in the line of duty

OR
The Veteran or service member died as a result of a service-connected disability

OR
The Veteran or service member is missing in action or was captured in the line of duty by a hostile force for more than 90 days

OR

The Veteran or service member was forcibly detained (held) or interned in the line of duty by a foreign entity for more than 90 days

OR

The service member is in the hospital or getting outpatient treatment for a service-connected permanent and total disability and is likely to be discharged for that disability

 

And one of these descriptions must be true for you:

- You’re 18 years old or older, or

- You completed high school or secondary education

Note: If you’re the child of a Veteran or service member, your marital status doesn’t affect your eligibility for DEA benefits.

We’ll send you a monthly payment to help you cover the cost of these programs:

- College or graduate degree programs

- Career-training certificate courses

- Apprenticeships

- On-the-job training

- You may also get educational and career counseling.

 

Note: If you use DEA benefits to pay for school or training that started before August 1, 2018, you may be able to get benefits for up to 45 months. If you started your school or training on or after August 1, 2018, you may be able to get benefits for up to 36 months.

FRY SCHOLARSHIPS:

Learn about the Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry Scholarship (Fry Scholarship), a scholarship for children and spouses of certain Veterans.

 

If your parent or spouse died in the line of duty on or after September 11, 2001, while serving in the Armed Forces, or was a member of the Selected Reserve who died from a service-connected disability, you may qualify for this benefit. Keep reading to find out if you’re eligible for education benefits through this scholarship.You may be eligible for Fry Scholarship benefits if you’re the child or surviving spouse of:

- A member of the Armed Forces who died in the line of duty while serving on active duty on or after September 11, 2001, or A member of the Armed Forces who died in the line of duty while not on active duty on or after September 11, 2001, or A member of the Selected Reserve who died from a service-connected disability on or after September 11, 2001

- As the child of a service member

- You can be married or unmarried. If you turned 18 or graduated from high school before January 1, 2013, you can get a Fry Scholarship until you’re 33 years old.

- If you turn 18 or graduate from high school after January 1, 2013, you can get a Fry Scholarship at any age over 18 or after you graduate (whichever comes first).

- If your parent was a member of the Selected Reserve and died from a service-connected disability while not on active duty, you can get a Fry Scholarship at any time, no matter how old you are.

- If your parent died in the line of duty before August 1, 2011, you may qualify for both the Fry Scholarship and the Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance (DEA) program. But you can use only one program at a time. We cap combined benefits at 81 months of full-time training.

Read about the DEA program

If you’re receiving Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC), you’ll need to give up those payments when you start to use the Fry Scholarship.

Read about DIC

As the spouse of a service member

If you remarry, you’ll no longer be eligible for the Fry Scholarship.

You can still get Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) payments while using the Fry Scholarship.

Read about DIC

Note: If your parent or spouse was “not on active duty,” this means they were a member of the Reserve serving on active duty for training or inactive duty training. This term doesn’t include Army and Air National Guard members who were on State orders (sometimes called “State Active Duty”).

You may be able to get up to 36 months of benefits, including:

- Money for tuition

- Money for housing

- Money for books and supplies

What if I qualify for both DEA and the Fry Scholarship?

You’ll need to pick one or the other. Once you make this choice, you can’t switch to the other program.

Exception: If you’re the child of a service member who died in the line of duty before August 1, 2011, you can use both DEA and the Fry Scholarship and get up to 81 months of education and training. You’ll need to use one program at a time.

TRANSFERRED EDUCATION BENEFITS FOR FAMILY MEMBERS:

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